Friday, June 25, 2021

Instructions for 9 year old and up to play Statis-Pro

Our second most read blogs are the quick rules on how to play Statis-Pro baseball, along with free player cards. This week I watched a 9 year old pick up our 30 sets of cards and figure out the game and play a bunch of games.

To do the same, all you need is two 6-sided dice, two 8-sided dice of different colors, and then to print out Statis-pro cards for the teams you want from the following links.

Click on the pitcher cards on this google drive, and printing the pages with the teams you want to play, then clicking on these batters cards and printing the batters on the same teams. Then you can cut the player cards from each page. I had actually printed the player cards for all 30 teams in and the 9 year old started picking teams and playing using the following process:

1. Take a stack of a team's cards and pick the pitcher you want to use. A PB 2-9 is the best, a PB 2-4 is the worst, and you need to start with a pitcher with a number other than "0" after the letters S/R and before the dash (so 13/4 can start with a 13, but 0/4 can only come in the game in relief).

2. Then pick 9 batters for the team, but look at the positions they can play under their name, and pick one of each of the following: C, 1B, 2B, 3B, SS, LF, CF, RF and one extra player from any position to be the Designated Hitter (DH), then put them in order and write their names in that order to keep score. (if the player prefers to let pitcher's hit, my cards have the pitcher hitting at the bottom of their cards, or you can use the average hitters card, 1Bf = 11, 1B7 = 12, 1B8 = 13, 1B9 = 14, K = 15-48, W = 51, HPB = 52, Out = 53-88.)

3. Starting with the first batter on the visiting team, roll the two six-sided dice to get a total from 2 to 12. We will use the Nationals Max Scherzer against Mookie Betts, with the Red Sox at the time. Look at the pitcher's number by his PB, a 2-8 for Scherzer, and if the roll is between those numbers (2-8) then we will use Scherzer's card for this at bat, but if the roll is higher than that (9-12) we will use Betts card.

4. Next take two 8-sided dice and pick which one will be the 10s (10, 20, 30 all the way to 80) and which will be the ones to get a total from 11-88 and then look at the card being used. For example, if the roll was 36 and you were using Scherzer's card based on the PB then that would be a strikeout in his 22-52 range, but if you were using Betts card then that would be a home run in his 35-43 range.

If any of the following things happen the pitcher gets a little more tired, so we start with his SR (or with for a reliever his RR) of 13 for Scherzer, and any time one of the following things happen his SR goes down by 1 until he goes all the way down from 13 to 0 and has to come out of the game.

1B - is a single and the batter goes to 1st base, and any other runners move up a base, but if their are two outs then any other runners move up two bases. (reduce pitcher SR or RR by 1, and by an extra 1 for each runner that scores).

2B - is a double and the batter goes to 2nd base, and any runners move up two bases, but if their are 2 outs then any runner on base scores. (reduce pitcher SR or RR by 1, and by an extra 1 for each runner that scores).

3B - is a triple, and any runners score. (reduce pitcher SR or RR by 1, and by an extra 1 for each runner that scores).

HR - is a home run and the batter and any runners score. (reduce pitcher SR or RR by 1, and by an extra 1 for each runner that scores, so on a home run the SR or RR is reduced by at least 2 because the runner gets on base AND he scores, but if any other runners score subtract an extra one).

W - walk, the batter gets 4 balls to walk and goes to first base (reduce pitcher SR or RR by 1, and by an extra 1 if a run scores because the bases are loaded).

HPB - the batter is Hit By a Pitched Ball and goes to first base (reduce pitcher SR or RR by 1, and by an extra 1 if a run scores because the bases are loaded).

These plays do NOT reduce the pitcher's SR or RR unless a runner is on third base, in which case the run scores and the pitcher's SR or RR is reduced by one.

BK - Balk, any runners on base move up a base and the batter is still at bat.

WP - Wild Pitch, any runners on base move up a base and the batter is still at bat.

CD-C or on other cards another "PB" - Passed Ball, any runners on base move up a base and the batter is still at bat. (the 9 year old actually did start to use the clutch defense chart for the catcher when the CD-C on my cards came up, but to keep it simply you can just score these all as passed balls, which is what still appears in this spot on all cards except the ones I make).

These plays do NOT reduce the pitcher's SR or RR, unless they are the third out of the inning. If they are the third out of the inning the pitcher's SR or RR is reduced by one for the end of the inning.

K - Strikeout.

Out - Out. When playing this basic game, just treat runners as though all outs are infield fliers - the same runners stay on the base they are on, and the batter is out. (for a more advanced game you use a 20-sided die on these charts to determine what kind of out, from a double play, to runners advancing while the batter is out, etc., but to just get a youngster playing they seemed comfortable just recording an "O" for out and moving to the next batter).

When the pitcher's SR or RR reaches 0, pick a new pitcher to take his place and use the RR, which is reduced the same way until he is also out of the game.

Here is how the 9 year old wrote out his line-ups and recorded the result for each batter with an "O" for out, "K" for stikeout, or a 1, 2, 3 or HR for single, double, triple or homer, or W for walk and then tracing a diamond to track that player around the bases. The small "O" by Tatis after his walk in the 7th wqs his note that Tatis was out trying to steal second.






We found the youngsters also wanted to see who can steal bases. When someone gets on base you can choose to try to steal either 2nd base or 3rd base by rolling one 6-sided die instead of both dice.

For the runner you want to steal, look at the letter by the SP (or if the card reads OBR/SP then look at the second letter, so Betts is an "A" but a card with an OBR/SP: A/B is a "B" because we use the second number.

Usually you only steal with an "A", but sometimes with a "B." When you roll the one dice:

1 = SP: AA, A, B or C steals the next base (2nd or 3rd), but D or E stays on the base.
2 = SP: AA, A or B steals the next base (2nd or 3rd), but C, D or E stays on the base.
3 = SP: AA or A steals the next base, but all others stay on the base.
4 = SP: AA steals the base, but all others stay on the base.
5 = The runner stays on the base and cannot steal.
6 = The runner is out trying to steal the next base.

Everything above lets you play any match-up you want.

You can add other things from the main game as you go, including adding a 20-sided die to determine what kind of out on these charts, but these simple steps allow you to play off entire Statis-Pro games or season. The nine year old and his brother actually played almost a dozen games in a couple of days.

Once the basic game is down if you want to play the more advanced game, I encourage you to find the Statis Pro Baseball Advanced Facebook page, where you can order charts, Fast Action Cards to replace the dice, and neat player cards as pictured. I do not have anything to do with the Advanced page, I just highly recommend it.





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