Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Accurate way to enter numbers to quickly create Statis-Pro cards and playoff great teams

Anytime you want to create your own Statis-Pro cards - whether they be for and Asian or Western league or college or historic teams - or current new players as we created here - you can plug in just a few stats on the google sheet at https://tinyurl.com/yd2cln8k and then use the player cards with the free Statis-Pro game.

On each sheet, enter the numbers in shaded yellow for the player, then card will be calculated below. You do not need to know the explanation, but for those who do we run through the ways that pitcher, hitting and fielding numbers are determined for the card.

Note for past players: If you've played Statis-Pro before, the only difference is that now when a Wild Pitch or Passed Ball results on the pitchers card it automatically happens (in the past Fast Action Cards then gave you a "yes" or "no" on the next card, which should now only be checked for Balks). 

Calculating Pitching Cards

Now for the important part - the calculations for the pitching cards are much easier than the old charts indicate.

The importance of doing the pitching cards this way is that the batters' cards are extremely accurate if and only if the pitchers card average out to 11 hits, 11 strikeouts and 7 walks, but with the pitchers' now average 17 strikeouts on their cards that is the new number used on the card - and you can search for "Yearly ave" to find the table below that shows the correct adjustment for every season from now back through 1901.

Formula to Calculate Pitcher’s PB – final number appears in Row 19

Square Root of (League ERA/Pitcher’s ERA) * 6.3 = PB


  • Limits: PB cannot be lower than 2-5, so if number calculates as 4 or lower change to a PB 2-5
  • If the pitchers (Games+Games Started)/2 in Row 17 equals at least 20, then his PB can be as high as a 2-9, so if pitcher calculates as 10 or higher, then change to PB 2-9.
  • If the pitchers (Games+Games Started)/2 in Row 17 equals 10-19, then the highest PB can be 2-8.
  • If the pitchers (Games+Games Started)/2 in Row 17 is 9 or lower, then his highest PB can be 2-7.

Formula to Calculate Pitcher’s SR and RR – Results in Row 20 and 21

Factor 1 = Walks + Hits
Factor 2 = (Games + Games Started)/2
Factor 3 = ERA * 1.75
(Factor 1 / Factor 2) + Factor 3 = SR
SR/2 = RR


  • If pitcher did not start any games, then put only the RR on the card and leave the SR 0, and if pitcher did not relieve in any games then put the SR on the card and leave the RR 0.
  • If you are planning to play a team from one year against other years, we we do with our match-up of 40 great teams from Honus Wagner's 1902 Pirates to the 2017 Houston Astros with the greatest three teams in history in between (1927, 1939 and 1998 Yankees), then you also need to look at the table to determine if you need to add to the SR. (e.g. Bob Gibson pitched in 1968 when there were almost no runners, so his SR increases by 4 when calculated).


Formula to Calculate Number of Hits on Cards

(Hits / Innings Pitched) * 11 = Hits on Card


Keep in mind the Random numbers do not include any digits of 0 or 8, so a pitcher allowing 0.68 to 0.76 hits per inning (bolded below) would allow 8 hits and thus an 11-18 on the card, but a pitcher in the next highest range (0.77 to 0.85 hits per inning) would have nine hits and go 11-21 since there is no Random Number of 19 or 20.

H/IP Range
Top Range
Hit Range on card
0.00
0.04
None
0.05
0.13
11
0.14
0.22
12
0.23
0.31
13
0.32
0.40
14
0.41
0.49
15
0.50
0.58
16
0.59
0.67
17
0.68
0.76
18
0.77
0.85
21
0.86
0.94
22
0.95
1.03
23
1.04
1.12
24
1.13
1.21
25
1.22
1.30
26
1.31
1.39
27
1.40
1.48
28
1.49
1.57
31
1.58
1.66
32
1.67
1.75
33
1.76
34
                                                                                                                                 
The old formula showed that the 11 hits on the average pitcher's card was subtracted when calculating the batter's card (see the bottom below the chart). This is often the case, but we actually use the number in the H/(PA/128)-below column on the big table further down so that in a year like 2007 when the average number of hits on a pitcher's card was 12, then that number is subtracted from the batters calculations.

The original charts that changed the ratio based on the pitcher’s PB of 2-9 to 2-5 were actually wrong because the ratios were set up backward and actually 2-9 pitchers should have had more hits on their card per H/IP, so use these calculations regardless of PB.


Formula to Calculate Number of Balks on Cards – Row 23 on spreadsheet

(Balks / IP) *25 = Balks on Card


The average is a little less than one balk per card, so just giving each pitcher one balk is pretty accurate if you don’t have that stat handy. So if your range of hits is the average 11-23, just putting 24 by the Balk is accurate most of the time though some would be blank. After drawing a balk number in a fast action deck the next “Pitch” card of YES or NO tells you if it was a balk or not – and if using dice you can roll one 6-sided die again and if the roll is 1 or 2 consider it a balk and if not ignore it. To be accurate, the next Random Number should stay on the pitcher’s card.



Formula to Calculate Number of Strikeouts on Cards – Row 24

(((Strikeouts / IP) - .38)) * 20 = Strikeouts on Card


A pitcher with the average number of hits and one balk number, who also had the average number of strikeouts on card (11) would have a range of 24-37 for strikeouts in most seasons. However, with the record strikeouts in baseball today the average pitcher has 17 strikeouts on his card - so a 24-44 strikeout range is average on 2017 and 2018 cards.


Formula to Calculate Number of Walks on Cards – Row 25

(Walks / IP) * 20 = Walks on card


Luckily walks have stayed pretty consistent over time, so the traditional number of 7 as an average has held up. However, as you can see from the table it does vary in some years - and you will see going back to 2015 it went down to 6 for the average number on a pitcher's card - and thus that is subtracted. But with the current average the same as the typical 7, the average pitcher's card now would have walks on 45-53.


Formula to Calculate Number of Passed Balls on Cards – Row 26

Walks on card x .1 = Passed Balls on Card


These should actually always be passed balls on cards based on the number of times they are likely to come up and the 45% of time there is a player on base to create the possibility of a passed ball, wild pitch or balk. I based this on breaking down the numbers from this study https://tinyurl.com/y83knjll of all base situations from 1984 to 1994 that showed there was no one on base 863,404 of 1,621,812 at bats (53% of the time) and estimating that the greater number of home runs and lower batting averages likely trimmed a couple of percent off the then 47% of the time to about 45% today. 


Formula to Calculate Number of Wild Pitches on Cards – Row 27

(Wild Pitches / IP) * 80 = Wild Pitches on card


You can use league default average of 3 numbers for Wild Pitch, but if you do calculate then the league leader in wild pitches last year - Jake Arrietta - had 14 wild pitches in 168 1/3 innings, which multiplied by 80 indicates 7 wild pitches on his card (6.54). However, for statistical accuracy, when no one is on base then a Balk, Wild Pitch or Passed Ball should all be scored as an out.

The fielding figures for a pitchers card and other players (E for Error of 0 to 10 and CD for Clutch Defense of CD1, CD2, CD3 or CD4 are on another sheet at that same spreadsheet.

Here is the year-by-year adjustment sheet for how many hits, walks and strikeouts were on the average pitcher's card every year and thus the number subtracted during the hitters' formulas below.


Yearly Adj          H/(PA/128)-belowH/(PA/128)-belowH/(PA/128)-belowIncrease SR if playing other yr
2018-11-7-172
2017-11-7-172
2016-11-7-172
2015-11-6-163
2014-11-6-163
2013-11-6-153
2012-11-6-153
2011-11-7-143
2010-11-7-142
2009-11-7-142
2008-11-7-142
2007-12-7-132
2006-12-7-131
2005-11-7-132
2004-11-7-132
2003-11-7-132
2002-11-7-132
2001-11-7-132
2000-12-8-131
1999-12-8-131
1998-11-7-132
1997-11-7-132
1996-12-8-131
1995-11-8-131
1994-12-7-121
1993-11-7-112
1992-11-7-113
1991-11-7-113
1990-11-7-113
1989-11-7-113
1988-11-7-113
1987-11-7-122
1986-11-7-122
1985-11-7-103
1984-11-7-103
1983-11-7-103
1982-11-7-103
1981-11-7-93
1980-11-7-93
1979-11-7-92
1978-11-7-93
1977-11-7-102
1976-11-7-93
1975-11-7-103
1974-11-7-103
1973-11-7-103
1972-10-7-114
1971-11-7-113
1970-11-8-113
1969-11-7-113
1968-10-6-124
1967-10-6-124
1966-11-6-113
1965-10-7-123
1964-11-6-123
1963-10-6-113
1962-11-7-112
1961-11-7-102
1960-11-7-103
1959-11-7-102
1958-11-7-103
1957-11-7-93
1956-11-8-92
1955-11-8-82
1954-11-8-82
1953-11-8-82
1952-11-8-83
1951-11-8-72
1950-11-9-71
1949-11-9-72
1948-11-8-72
1947-11-8-72
1946-11-8-73
1945-11-7-63
1944-11-7-63
1943-11-7-63
1942-11-7-63
1941-11-8-62
1940-12-7-72
1939-12-7-62
1938-12-8-61
1937-12-7-71
1936-12-7-61
1935-12-7-61
1934-12-7-61
1933-12-6-52
1932-12-7-61
1931-12-7-62
1930-13-7-60
1929-12-7-51
1928-12-7-52
1927-12-6-52
1926-12-7-52
1925-13-7-51
1924-12-6-52
1923-12-7-52
1922-12-6-51
1921-12-6-51
1920-12-6-52
1919-11-6-53
1918-10-6-54
1917-10-6-64
1916-10-6-74
1915-10-6-74
1914-10-6-73
1913-11-6-73
1912-11-7-72
1911-11-7-72
1910-10-6-74
1909-10-6-74
1908-10-5-74
1907-10-5-64
1906-10-5-74
1905-10-5-73
1904-10-5-74
1903-11-5-72
1902-12-5-52
1901-12-5-61

Formulas for calculating batter's cards (very simple)

Batting Formulas

At Bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch / 128 = Batting Factor
(Hits / Batting Factor) - NUMBER IN THE FIRST COLUMN TO THE LEFT OF THE YEAR ABOVE = total hits on card
(Strikeouts / Batting Factor) - NUMBER IN THE THIRD COLUMN TO THE RIGHT OF THE YEAR = total strikeouts on card
(Walks / Batting Factor) - NUMBER IN THE 2ND COLUMN TO THE LEFT OF THE YEAR (USUALLY A -7) = total walks on card
(2b / Batting Factor) - total doubles on card
(3b / Batting Factor) - total doubles on card
(HR / Batting Factor) - total doubles on card
(HBP/ Batting Factor) - total doubles on card

The average card this year calculated to 18 hits, which would go from 11-32 on the Random Number scale of 64 numbers from 11-88 since no 0s or 9s are included. The average player also calculates to 4 home run numbers, so the 27-32 would be Home Runs, then fill in all the numbers. Record if the player is right-handed, left-handed or a switch hitter, and based on if he has at least 4 Home run numbers he is a Power hitter, or 3 or less and he is a normal hitter, so combine for one of these: RN, RP, LN, LP, SP, SN or for a pitcher batting always just put P by Cht.

On-base Running and Steals


Running Opportunity Factor = (Hits + Walks - Home Runs - Triples)

(Stolen Bases / Running Opportunity Factor) * 44 = Number to use for SB

(Triples + Stolen Bases + Runs - Home Runs) / Running Opportunity Factor) * 5.5 = Number to use for OBR

Once you have that number for each, 0 = E, 1 = D, 2 = C, 3 = B, 4 = A and 7 or higher on SB only equals AA.

Fielding Stats can be standard

CD2, E4, TB or T3 can be standard, but below are ways they can be calculated.

However, the fielding tab does give you a table to determine the Error (E) rating based on fielding percentage. A catcher who throws out 33% or more of baserunners is a TA, while 25% or more is a TB, and others are a TC. Outfielders with great arms are a T5, good arms are a T4, average is a T3 and weak arms are a T2 if you want to go that far.

For Clutch Defense, we only give CD4 ratings to players nominated for a gold glove within the past couple of years, and after that look at Defensive War (2.0 or higher is a CD3, 0.5 or higher is a CD2, and 0.4 down to negatives is a CD1.

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